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Murad Prokhorov
Murad Prokhorov

Theological Dictionary Of The New Testament Extra Quality


But beware of a common charge leveled against the series. Just because a word had a specific meaning in 500 B.C. does not mean this is how Paul uses the word in the New Testament. Use the histroical data with great care. Also beware of the theological bias of many of the writers; they were not generally evangelical




Theological Dictionary of the New Testament


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One of the most widely-used and well-respected theological dictionaries ever created, TDNT is indispensable for studies in the Greek New Testament and theology. Words were selected for inclusion in this dictionary based on their theological significance. The historical development and theological nuances of each word are exhaustively explored. The authors trace usage in classical Greek literature, the Old Testament (LXX) and extrabiblical texts, and New Testament passages.


Geoffrey W. Bromiley (1915-2009) was professor emeritus of Church History and Historical Theology at Fuller Theological Seminary in Pasadena, California. He was best known as the translator of numerous theological books, including Theological Dictionary of the New Testament.


This English edition attempts to serve the needs of Old Testament students without the linguistic background of more advanced scholars; it does so, however, without sacrificing the needs of the latter. Ancient scripts (Hebrew, Greek, etc.) are regularly transliterated in a readable way, and meanings of foreign words are given in many cases where the meanings might be obvious to advanced scholars. Where the Hebrew text versification differs from that of English Bibles, the English verse appears in parentheses. Such features will help all earnest students of the Bible to avail themselves of the manifold theological insights contained in this monumental work.


Mediating between ordinary lexicography and the specific task of exposition, TDNT treats more than 2,300 theologically significant New Testament words, including the more important prepositions and numbers as well as many proper names from the Old Testament. Presenting the words in the order of the Greek alphabet, TDNT typically discusses the following for each word: its secular Greek background, its role in the Old Testament, its use in extrabiblical Jewish literature, and its varied uses in the New Testament. Substantial bibliographies and footnotes supplement the articles.


Geoffrey W. Bromiley (1915 2009) was professor emeritus of Church History and Historical Theology at Fuller Theological Seminary in Pasadena, California. He was best known as the translator of numerous theological books, including the 9-volume Theological Dictionary of the New Testament.


Although greatly reduced in scholarly detail, Bromiley's abridgement enjoys wide appeal, especially to students with a limited knowledge of Greek and to scholars who want a quick and convenient "lookup" of a powerfully-distilled Kittel entry. Nevertheless, while Dr. Bromiley's work focuses especially on biblical usage, the "Little Kittel" has a significant amount of detail for those who want to learn about New Testament Greek words, including their theological significance, their secular Greek background, their role in the Old Testament pertaining to both Hebrew and Septuagint texts, their use in other ancient literature, their varied meanings in the New Testament, and in some cases their application by the apostolic fathers.


TDNT stands for Theological Dictionary of the New Testament which was edited by Gerhard Kittel and Gerhard Friedrich and translated from the German by Geoffrey W. Bromiley. This 10-volume set is a standard resource for in-depth word studies of every word of theological or religious significance in the Greek New Testament. In the editor's preface, Bromiley states, "While it is not a simple lexicon, it obviously cannot replace either the full commentary or the biblical theology" (Vol 1, ix). One of the other distinctions of TDNT is its use of many different contributors.


Substantial articles on 2000+ Greek words that are theologically significant in the New Testament. Traces usage in classical Greek literature, the Septuagint, intertestamental texts, and the New Testament.


Beginning with 'ābh ('āb), "father," and continuing through the alphabet, the TDOT volumes present in-depth discussions of the key Hebrew and Aramaic words in the Old Testament. Leading scholars of various religious traditions (including Roman Catholic, Lutheran, Reformed, Anglican, Greek Orthodox, and Jewish) and from many parts of the world (Denmark, France, Germany, Great Britain, Greece, Israel, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United States) have been carefully selected for each article by editors Botterweck, Ringgren, and Fabry and their consultants, George W. Anderson, Henri Cazelles, David Noel Freedman, Shemaryahu Talmon, and Gerhard Wallis. The intention of the writers is to concentrate on meaning, starting from the more general, everyday senses and building to an understanding of theologically significant concepts. To avoid artificially restricting the focus of the articles, TDOT considers under each keyword the larger groups of words that are related linguistically or semantically. The lexical work includes detailed surveys of a word's occurrences, not only in biblical material but also in other ancient Near Eastern writings. Sumerian, Akkadian, Egyptian, Ethiopic, Ugaritic, and Northwest Semitic sources are surveyed, among others, as well as the Qumran texts and the Septuagint; and in cultures where no cognate word exists, the authors often consider cognate ideas. TDOT's emphasis, though, is on Hebrew terminology and on biblical usage. The contributors employ philology as well as form-critical and traditio-historical methods, with the aim of understanding the religious statements in the Old Testament. Extensive bibliographical information adds to the value of this reference work. This English edition attempts to serve the needs of Old Testament students without the linguistic background of more advanced scholars; it does so, however, without sacrificing the needs of the latter. Ancient scripts (Hebrew, Greek, etc.) are regularly transliterated in a readable way, and meanings of foreign words are given in many cases where the meanings might be obvious to advanced scholars. Where the Hebrew text versification differs from that of English Bibles, the English verse appears in parentheses. Such features will help all earnest students of the Bible to avail themselves of the manifold theological insights contained in this monumental work. if (window['_OC_autoDir']) _OC_autoDir('search_form_input');Preview this book What people are saying - Write a reviewReviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identifiedUser Review - Steven Schank - Christianbook.comThese volumes have a liberal slant to them, but are the best in Hebrew word study. The only complaint is that there is "transliteration" for Hebrew words within the text instead of the Hebrew. I know ... Read full review


  • Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing

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_OC_InitNavbar("child_node":["title":"My library","url":" =114584440181414684107\u0026source=gbs_lp_bookshelf_list","id":"my_library","collapsed":true,"title":"My History","url":"","id":"my_history","collapsed":true,"title":"Books on Google Play","url":" ","id":"ebookstore","collapsed":true],"highlighted_node_id":"");Theological Dictionary of the New Testament, Volume XGerhard Kittel, Geoffrey William Bromiley, Gerhard Friedrich, Ronald E. PitkinWm. B. Eerdmans Publishing, 1964 - Bible - 661 pages 1 ReviewReviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identifiedKittels Theological Dictionary of the New Testament is simply the most in-depth word study tool available. It contains articles on significant theological words in the New Testament, covering their usage in the Old Testament, their secular Greek background, their use in sources such as Josephus, Philo, pseudepigraphal and rabbinical literature, and their use in the New Testament. Where relevant, a subsection on a words use in the Apostolic Fathers is provided. Volume 10 is the index volume and it has indexes for English key words, Greek key words, and scripture references. if (window['_OC_autoDir']) _OC_autoDir('search_form_input');Preview this book What people are saying - Write a reviewReviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identifiedUser Review - Flag as inappropriateKittel X, Index


  • Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing

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_OC_InitNavbar("child_node":["title":"My library","url":" =114584440181414684107\u0026source=gbs_lp_bookshelf_list","id":"my_library","collapsed":true,"title":"My History","url":"","id":"my_history","collapsed":true,"title":"Books on Google Play","url":" ","id":"ebookstore","collapsed":true],"highlighted_node_id":"");Theological Dictionary of the Old Testament: Volume VIIG. Johannes Botterweck, Helmer Ringgren, Heinz-Josef FabryWm. B. Eerdmans Publishing, 1974 - Religion - 578 pages 3 ReviewsReviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identifiedThis multivolume work is still proving to be as fundamental to Old Testament studies as its companion set, the Kittel-Friedrich Theological Dictionary of the New Testament, has been to New Testament studies. Beginning with father, and continuing through the alphabet, the TDOT volumes present in-depth discussions of the key Hebrew and Aramaic words in the Old Testament. Leading scholars of various religious traditions (including Roman Catholic, Lutheran, Reformed, Anglican, Greek Orthodox, and Jewish) and from many parts of the world (Denmark, France, Germany, Great Britain, Greece, Israel, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United States) have been carefully selected for each article by editors Botterweck, Ringgren, and Fabry and their consultants, George W. Anderson, Henri Cazelles, David Noel Freedman, Shemaryahu Talmon, and Gerhard Wallis. The intention of the writers is to concentrate on meaning, starting from the more general, everyday senses and building to an understanding of theologically significant concepts. To avoid artificially restricting the focus of the articles, TDOT considers under each keyword the larger groups of words that are related linguistically or semantically. The lexical work includes detailed surveys of a word s occurrences, not only in biblical material but also in other ancient Near Eastern writings. Sumerian, Akkadian, Egyptian, Ethiopic, Ugaritic, and Northwest Semitic sources are surveyed, among others, as well as the Qumran texts and the Septuagint; and in cultures where no cognate word exists, the authors often consider cognate ideas. TDOT s emphasis, though, is on Hebrew terminology and on biblical usage. The contributors employ philology as well as form-critical and traditio-historical methods, with the aim of understanding the religious statements in the Old Testament. Extensive bibliographical information adds to the value of this reference work. This English edition attempts to serve the needs of Old Testament students without the linguistic background of more advanced scholars; it does so, however, without sacrificing the needs of the latter. Ancient scripts (Hebrew, Greek, etc.) are regularly transliterated in a readable way, and meanings of foreign words are given in many cases where the meanings might be obvious to advanced scholars. Where the Hebrew text versification differs from that of English Bibles, the English verse appears in parentheses. Such features will help all earnest students of the Bible to avail themselves of the manifold theological insights contained in this monumental work. if (window['_OC_autoDir']) _OC_autoDir('search_form_input');Preview this book What people are saying - Write a reviewReviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identifiedUser Review - Steven Schank - Christianbook.comThese volumes have a liberal slant to them, but are the best in Hebrew word study. The only complaint is that there is "transliteration" for Hebrew words within the text instead of the Hebrew. I know ... Read full review 041b061a72


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